Enhance your curriculum by addressing the QAA Guidance on skills for your subject, and incorporating the QAA (2018) Guidance on Enterprise and Entrepreneurship.

QAA Benchmark Statement

This contains examples from EEUK Fellows,.

This reflects practice rather than the underpinning skills identified within QAA (2018) guidance

Embedding Enterprise

The following ETC tools can help you to deliver these skills in the curriculum

How To Guides

These guides have been selected to build QAA (2018) enterprise skills in your teaching.


Your How To Guide Here

If you would like to have your How to Guide featured, please download the template and email the completed version to hello@etctoolkit.org.uk.

We have produced a guidance sheet which will assist you in completing the How to Guide.

If you have any questions regarding completing the template, please Contact Us.

Case Examples

CEO Staff Development Programme Enterprise Evolution FEEUK

Group Size ? 1.) Small group (teams of 4-6)
2.) Individual Task
3.) Large Group
4.) Any

Small group (teams of 4-6)

Learning Environment ? 1.) Lecture Theatre
2.) Presentation Space
3.) Carousel Tables (small working group)
4.) Any
5.) Outside
6.) Special

Carousel Tables (small working group)

QAA Enterprise Theme(s) ? 1.) Creativity and Innovation
2.) Opportunity recognition, creation and evaluation
3.) Decision making supported by critical analysis and judgement
4.) Implementation of ideas through leadership and management
5.) Reflection and Action
6.) Interpersonal Skills
7.) Communication and Strategy
8.) Digital and Data Skills

1Creativity and Innovation 2Opportunity recognition‚ creation and evaluation 3Decision making supported by critical analysis and judgement 4Implementation of ideas through leadership and management 5Reflection and Action 6Interpersonal Skills 7Communication and Strategy

Objective:

The CEO programme is a staff development programme offered in China as a two-day intensive workshop. Built upon a philosophy of “learning by doing” and high levels of staff/delegate engagement, this programme seeks to move staff from the traditional teaching approaches which are prevalent in China to incorporating Entrecomp (2018) as a way to incorporate enterprise as well as the concept of constructive alignment (Biggs) in curriculum design. This approach has been specifically created to address the needs of Chinese educators in creating entrepreneurial outcomes for their learners. At the end of the CEO programme, the delegates (teachers in any subject areas) will be able to Explain the need, context and rationale for enterprise education Identify appropriate methods to embed enterprise education into your teaching Formulate (create) your own approach embedding enterprise education

Introduction:

The CEO Programme was co-created by Alison Price Enterprise Evolution UK and Zhang Jing in Enterprise Evolution China, which is the first Sino-UK designed staff development programme across China (over 300+ delegates so far). The focus is threefold a) to change teachers’ mindset and raise awareness b) help them embed enterprise in their curriculum design and delivery so that they can create entrepreneurial graduates who are able to cope with uncertainty, ambiguity and risks in the future and c) provide them with the tools to create change in the classroom/with their own approaches. Activity case: The programme is delivered in a 2-day workshop style. Each theme/technique follows a philosophy of learning by doing and is built upon four equally important stages, i.e. explain, experience, reflect and apply. Programme outline is as follows:

  1. Definition of enterprise education (Entrecomp 2018)
  2. The Role of the tutor (changing relationship between teachers and students)
  3. CEO programme rationale and structure
  4. Curriculum design: framing enterprise education around skills
  5. Experiencing techniques through customer-centred thinking
  6. Teaching techniques demonstrated throughout the programme.

The CEO diagram guides the process of curriculum design (see attached) through a user/student centred curriculum development process. The CEO diagram is presented as a “canvas” for the delegates to develop their thinking with. Typically, they can work in groups to develop this, but often find that individual notes are useful to progress this thinking after the programme.

 

The process unfolds by:

1. Identifying the needs of the future graduate: drawing together staff aspirations, sector or (inter)national needs with institutional outcomes (stated graduate outcomes) can create an overview of the intended outcome (impact) of any programme. By opening up the thinking to address changing environmental (PEST) and institutional or subject needs, the student and their future needs is placed at the core of any curriculum change.

2. Sector needs: drawing upon sector/industry changes and alumni advice and guidance can illuminate changes that need to be addressed in delivery or skill development. This intel may be drawn from staff, national reporting or sector evidence, as well as programme/module feedback/alumni comment

3. Subject knowledge/Enterprise competences: staff are invited to focus on their traditional “input” view of teaching (knowledge they wish to impact) but now in conjunction with their understanding of enterprise (definition; Entrecomp competences) Together these elements create an understanding of who the student is – their needs and industry requirements.

This creates a basis for planning new curriculum that is rooted within the traditional Chinese approach of knowledge exchange, but now includes an appreciation of preparing students for their futures and supporting this through the clear development of enterprise competences (Entrecomp 2018). These stages are delivered in an interactive workshop style that builds delegates understanding whilst demonstrating a range of teaching techniques such as use of post-its, drawing, small group discussion, research and presentation.

This showcases how Entrecomp competences can be taught, whilst creating knowledge driven outcomes. The next process within the CEO diagram is to work through Biggs Constructive Alignment, incorporating understanding of student development needs (scaffolding) and feedback (feedforward) required. The delegates are then invited to use this process to create a new module, drawing upon the menu of teaching techniques that they have been exposed to during the programme, in order to present their new approach for peer review. Delegates are able to engage with this scaffolded approach and build their own skills and confidence to move from a traditional “guru” based teaching style to a more collaborative, student focused (facilitated) approach to teaching. Delegates also invited to take this process away and use with colleagues, leading them to create curriculum change.

Impact:

Since the launch of the programme in July 2017, more than 300 delegates have been trained and feedback has been extremely positive, with 98% of delegates who responded to the CEO evaluation, saying that they would like to recommend the programme to others; Those who attended the programme have already reported significant changes in their own practice and received recognition, such as a

• delegate from Polytechnic University delegate who attended the programme in December 2017 created his own approach built around the acronym “IPAD” which won him a provincial teaching award;

• Nankai University delegate who attended the programme in November 2017 created significant change for which they won a university award in May 2019;

• At the time of writing, a delegate from Shougang Institute of Technology has been shortlisted for Beijing Municipal Teaching Competition.

Learner outcomes:

The outcomes for staff range from building knowledge and understanding through to creating change in their own practice, as the CEO programme takes them through the following key areas to consider the impact (outcome) for their approach to teaching.

  1. Appreciating context & change: Consider how universities should help graduates prepare for the future challenges brought by the fourth industrial revolution (volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity);
  2. Student focus: Change curriculum design which is centred around learners, learners’ competencies and learners’ learning outcomes;
  3. Constructive Alignment: Use Bloom’s Taxonomy and constructive alignment to embed enterprise in the curriculum design;
  4. Teaching techniques: Experience approx. new 50 teaching techniques, reflecting upon how to adapt them in their own teaching;
  5. Student engagement: Learn how to better engage and inspire learners;
  6. Support: Build up a network and share class room experience.

Resources:

  • CEO programme diagram and  Enterprise Evolution EntreComp competency cards;
  • EntreComp diagram;
  • Post-its;
  • Pens;
  • A1 and A4 paper; 

References:

Bacigalupo, M., Kampylis, P., Punie, Y., Van den Brande, G. (2016). EntreComp: The Entrepreneurship Competence Framework. Publication Office of the European Union; Luxembourg, EUR 27939 http://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/bitstream/JRC101581/lfna27939enn.pdf

Gibb,A and Price, A (Published: 2nd Edition, 2014; first published in 2007) A Compendium of Pedagogies for Teaching Entrepreneurship http://ncee.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Compendium-of-Pedagogies.pdf

Quality Assurance Agency (2012)Enterprise and entrepreneurship education: guidance for UK higher education providers. (Version 1) QAA (2018) Enterprise and Entrepreneurship Education: Guidance for UK Higher Education Providers http://www.qaa.ac.uk/docs/qaas/enhancement-and-development/enterprise-and-entrpreneurship-education-2018.pdf?sfvrsn=15f1f981_8 McCallum, Weicht, McMullan and Price (2018) “EntreComp into Action - Get inspired, make it happen: A user guide to the European Entrepreneurship Competence Framework” (Editors: Bacigalupo, M and O’Keefe, W) http://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC109128

More details: http://enterpriseevolution.org.uk/work-in-china-4/

About the Author
This guide was produced by Jing Zhang (Founder Beijing Weishengchang International Education and Culture Consultancy Company Ltd ).

HEEP University of Huddersfield Enterprise Education (Staff) Prog (QAA 1 4 5) FEEUK

Group Size ? 1.) Small group (teams of 4-6)
2.) Individual Task
3.) Large Group
4.) Any

Any

Learning Environment ? 1.) Lecture Theatre
2.) Presentation Space
3.) Carousel Tables (small working group)
4.) Any
5.) Outside
6.) Special

Any

QAA Enterprise Theme(s) ? 1.) Creativity and Innovation
2.) Opportunity recognition, creation and evaluation
3.) Decision making supported by critical analysis and judgement
4.) Implementation of ideas through leadership and management
5.) Reflection and Action
6.) Interpersonal Skills
7.) Communication and Strategy
8.) Digital and Data Skills

1Creativity and Innovation 4Implementation of ideas through leadership and management 5Reflection and Action

Objective:

• Building skills and confidence in University of Huddersfield staff (enterprise agenda; entrepreneurial education; pedagogical techniques)
• Developing entrepreneurial confidence and practice in students
• Contributing positively towards the development of enterprising graduates
• Build ‘up-stream’ enterprise confidence/competencies in students who may then go on to engage in business start-up activities via the Enterprise Team provision
• Further the entrepreneurial culture of the institution

Introduction:

The University of Huddersfield has a clear commitment to Enterprise, as evidenced by:

  • Dedicated Enterprise Team with in-house Business Advisors (Est 2004)
  • The Duke of York Young Entrepreneur Centre in 3M Buckley Innovation Centre (2013)

Resulting in:

  • THE Entrepreneurial University of the Year (2012),
  • Queens Award for Enterprise (2013)

Building upon these achievements, the Enterprise Team recognised a further need and opportunity to support academic staff to embed enterprise in the curriculum. This staff CPD opportunity developed and promoted entrepreneurial skills, culture and mind-sets, across a diverse range of subject disciplines and contextual backgrounds by delivering to staff from 6 of the university’s academic Schools and also the Student Union. Whilst the project aimed to assist academic staff to embed enterprise into their course modules, the opportunity to engage with the SU offered further added value. It enabled key SU Staff, responsible for ensuring that the student-led societies are managed and developed in an enterprising and sustainable way, to also benefit from the development programme and to significantly increase the number of beneficiaries via the student-led societies.

Activities:

  1. Working with 10 staff on 10 specific and diverse undergraduate/postgraduate modules, in order to change teaching methods to create entrepreneurial outcomes in students.
  2. By reviewing module descriptors and changing teaching methods to engage external stakeholders and community groups
  3. Assessing the understanding and potential value of enterprise education in the staff at the start and end of the intervention to monitor impact

 

The Programme was delivered in the following manner:

  • Initial workshop for all staff to discuss the programme’s aims and objectives and address commonality of language relating to Enterprise Education. Sharing of key resources such as the QAA Guidelines on Enterprise and Entrepreneurship Education/ETC ToolKit/EntreComp Framework and an opportunity to share current practice across a wide range of disciplines and academic Schools
  • A period of 1:1 support offered to all staff to develop and adapt existing module descriptors and to embed enterprise activities. Creation of bespoke action plans for staff members to develop confidence
  • Final workshop after the end of the first semester to assess student response and engagement across the cohort and to exchange best practise and advise of potential next steps for the cohort, e.g. ETC ToolKit Case Study and/or EEUK Fellowship application

Impact:

The design of this programme ensured impact across three main parameters:

  1. Volume: This project will deliver high volume of beneficiaries by through working directly with 10 key staff (academics and SU). Each of the 10 modules identified creates access to students as well approx. 100 student-led societies. By embedding enterprise within pre-identified existing modules, the volume is secured, and then further through the planned cascade of these project outcomes to others.
  2. Type: focused upon staff, this project has been carefully designed to cascade impact to other beneficiaries and create long-term change. With impact initially focused upon curriculum change through staff/modules, the intended outputs will be delivered for staff, the wider community as well as key disadvantaged groups within the university’s student community and beyond. 
  3. Depth: designed specifically to deliver depth, this project will create lasting change that reaches across the university and its wider community.


By envisioning this is a pilot project, the impact will be lasting as curriculum change will continue beyond the pilot stage. This enabled multiple impact layers for key stakeholders by:

 

  • Enabling widespread and diverse enterprise education engagement across the institution
  • Contribution to the existing Enterprise/Entrepreneurship provision at the UoH by building pipeline development from within academic course content
  • Impact above and beyond just ‘within the curriculum’, but leading to extra-curricular enterprise opportunities via the existing Enterprise Team
  • External tertiary beneficiaries will be impacted where our students/staff engage with external organisations and partners

Resources: 

The ETC Toolkit for examples of enterprise ‘Case Studies’ and ‘How To’ sessions in disciplinary specific settings (www.etctoolkit.org.uk)

The EntreComp Framework to demonstrate the scale/scope and learner outcome potential of Enterprise Education (https://ec.europa.eu/jrc/en/publication/eur-scientific-and-technical-research-reports/entrecomp-action-get-inspired-make-it-happen-user-guide-european-entrepreneurship-competence)


References:

The rationale for putting staff development at the heart of our proposed project was drawn from best practice and policy, notably QAA Guidelines for Enterprise and Entrepreneurship Education in Higher Education (2018) which states: 

• “take a contextualised approach that enables students to enhance their entrepreneurial capabilities within their subject”
• “use experiential learning strategies where theory follows practice and provide theory support and encourage discussion on the merits and demerits of the theories under consideration”
• “the educator can select delivery methods based on the behaviours, attributes and competencies they wish to enhance and develop” (p13)
• “practical opportunities for gaining experience can be created both within the curriculum and through optional extracurricular activity that complements learning within the curriculum, and recognises the value of extracurricular experiences for confidence building” (p18)
• “students should be encouraged to develop self-awareness of their own enterprising and entrepreneurial capabilities, as well as the motivation and self-discipline to apply these flexibly in different context to achieved desired results” (p19)

 

About the Author
This guide was produced by Philip Clegg FEEUK (Head of Enterprise & Entrepreneurship, The University of Huddersfield).

Your Example Here

If you would like to have your Case Study featured, please download the template and email the completed version to hello@etctoolkit.org.uk.

We have produced a guidance sheet which will assist you in completing the Case Study.

If you have any questions regarding completing the template, please Contact Us.

Embedding Entrepreneurship

If you or your students are interested in developing a business idea, becoming self-employed/freelance or creating a business here are some tools to help and also some links to business start-up support.

How To Guides

These guides have been selected to build QAA (2018) entrepreneurship skills in your teaching.


Your How To Guide Here

If you would like to have your How to Guide featured, please download the template and email the completed version to hello@etctoolkit.org.uk.

We have produced a guidance sheet which will assist you in completing the How to Guide.

If you have any questions regarding completing the template, please Contact Us.

Case Examples

Your Example Here

If you would like to have your Case Study featured, please download the template and email the completed version to hello@etctoolkit.org.uk.

We have produced a guidance sheet which will assist you in completing the Case Study.

If you have any questions regarding completing the template, please Contact Us.

Additional Resources